Wildlife Educator Keeps Kids Connected to Nature During the Coronavirus Crisis

– Christine’s Critters Virtual Programs Provide Daily Science Lessons to Entertain and Educate Kids -


Reading Time: 3 minutes

Kids are facing weeks at home during the coronavirus pandemic, so one wildlife educator is taking her wildlife programs online through Facebook Live and continuing to educate children about birds of prey and wildlife conservation.

Christine’s Critters, Inc., run by Christine Peyreigne, is a non-profit organization based in Weston, Connecticut that rescues, rehabilitates, and educates about birds of prey and reptiles, gives new meaning to ‘the show must go on.’

Virtual Show Must Go On

School closures began mounting and their programs were canceled.

So Christine and her Mom, Betsy, took their school programs online so that the kids at home can see the presentations broadcast live from their living room.

Christine educates the audience about Mr. Higgins, a Northern Saw-whet Owl
Christine educates the audience about Mr. Higgins, a Northern Saw-whet Owl

Schools rely on these types of wildlife programs to serve as science and ecology lessons.

Now that kids are home from school, that means an absence of many outlets for fun, and Christine’s programs give the kids something to look at, learn more about, and ask questions.

And the programs are things they can share together while being apart.

The hour Christine is broadcasting gives work-from-home parents a much-needed break.

Or they can enjoy the show with their kids.

Fans tuned in to watch Christine's Critters program on Facebook Live
Fans tuned in to watch Christine’s Critters program on Facebook Live

Engaging Virtual Audience

During the one-hour broadcast, airing Monday through Friday at 11am EST, Christine and Betsy introduce a critter to the audience, explaining the animal’s story to an engaging virtual audience.

If she’s presenting a bird of prey, Christine uses a birdsong identifier to play that bird’s call for viewers so they can learn to identify their calls in the wild.

Christine introduces viewers to Ariel, a Broad-winged Hawk
Christine introduces viewers to Ariel, a Broad-winged Hawk

The moment Christine introduces a new bird of prey to the audience, viewers send a flurry of hearts floating across the screen.

Viewers get to meet Christine’s resident education ambassador birds, and reptiles.

Salsa, the American Kestrel.

Ariel, the Broad-winged Hawk.

Magma, the red-phase Eastern Screen Owl.

Viewers light up Facebook with hearts when Christine introduces Cypress, the Barred Owl
Viewers light up Facebook with hearts when Christine introduces Cypress, the Barred Owl

Equinox, the Peregrine Falcon.

Cypress, the Barred Owl.

Amelia, the Red-Tailed Hawk.

Mr. Higgins, the Northern Saw-whet owl.

Lemon Drops, the Burmese Python.

Lemon Drops the Burmese Python
Lemon Drops the Burmese Python

Priscilla, the Hog Island Python.

Just to name a few.

Viewers can submit their questions live, and Christine and Betsy answer them.

Christine introduces viewers to As, a gray-phase Eastern Screech Owl
Christine introduces viewers to As, a gray-phase Eastern Screech Owl

Wildlife Educator Provides a Sense of Connection

At the end of the presentation, Christine asks viewers to write out ten things they learned about the bird of prey and reptiles they saw that day as a homework assignment.

And then draw pictures of their favorite animal and send it to her.

Kids comply, submitting their drawings, and Christine posts them on Christine’s Critter’s Facebook page.

A girl doing her homework assignment from Christine and drawings submitted of viewer's favorite critter
A girl doing her homework assignment from Christine and drawings submitted of viewer’s favorite critter

Each drawing is adorable and is proof Christine is educating kids through virtual programs.

If the presentation focuses on owls, Christine ends the program by asking the audiences to listen for owls at night.

Christine shows viewers what Magma, a red-phase eastern Screech Owl looked like as a chick
Christine shows viewers what Magma, a red-phase eastern Screech Owl looked like as a chick

The one-hour program is a fantastic show packed with and show and tell that keeps everyone’s attention.

Viewers can submit questions to Christine and Betsy during the live program
Viewers can submit questions to Christine and Betsy during the live program

Be sure to follow Christine’s Critters on Facebook to get notified and upcoming programs.

And tune in every weekday at 11am to meet some fascinating critters.

Don’t worry if you miss the live broadcast, the program is recorded so you can watch it later.

Support Christine Critters and Wildlife Educators

Thankfully because of Christine’s Critters and their ‘show must go on’ can-do attitude, viewers are enjoying the wildlife programs and feeling a sense of connection with each other.

It’s important to note that Christine’s Critters is a non-profit.

The programs we see online for free are held at schools to generate program fees helping to pay for the birds of prey under Christine’s care.

Christine’s Critters cares for 23 resident birds with hearty appetites and expensive vet bills.

And helps more than 250 rehab patients recovering from injuries that return to the wild.

These types of organizations rely on funding through donations and program fees, so lost school programs have a significant impact.

To get involved, donate, send needed supplies from Christine’s Critters’ Amazon wishlist, or just volunteer go to https://www.christinescritters.org/get_involved.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Loading…

0
Barn_Swallow_Brian_E_Kushner

Data Reveals the Natural Wonder of Bird Migration

Here’s How to Defeat the Birding Blues

How to Beat the Birding Blues